Resecō Inform

Open enrollment fairs are a great way for employers and benefits providers to help employees understand and enroll in the benefits programs that meet their needs.

These fairs are typically done in person, and they allow employees to learn about available benefits and discuss offerings with providers. Just as the COVID-19 pandemic may be changing what employees need for benefits, the format of open enrollment events should change, too. With open enrollment season around the corner and many organizations extending work-from-home policies, a virtual open enrollment fair may be necessary. This article explores benefits and best practices for organizations moving their open enrollment events online.

To prepare for open enrollment, group health plan sponsors should be aware of the legal changes affecting the design and administration of their plans for plan years beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2021. Employers should review their plan documents to confirm that they include these required changes.

In addition, any changes to a health plan’s benefits for the 2021 plan year should be communicated to plan participants through an updated summary plan description (SPD) or a summary of material modifications (SMM). Health plan sponsors should also confirm that their open enrollment materials contain certain required participant notices, when applicable—for example, the summary of benefits and coverage (SBC). There are also some participant notices that must be provided annually or upon initial enrollment. To minimize costs and streamline administration, employers should consider including these notices in their open enrollment materials.

Open enrollment fairs are a great way for employers and benefits providers to help employees understand and enroll in the benefits programs that meet their needs.

These fairs are typically done in person, and they allow employees to learn about available benefits and discuss offerings with providers. Just as the COVID-19 pandemic may be changing what employees need for benefits, the format of open enrollment events should change, too. With open enrollment season around the corner and many organizations extending work-from-home policies, a virtual open enrollment fair may be necessary. This article explores benefits and best practices for organizations moving their open enrollment events online.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThis toolkit serves as an introduction to workplace stress and provides several ways that employers can address and mitigate stress in the workplace. It is not intended as legal or medical advice and should only be used for informational purposes.

Introduction

According to a Gallup poll, 55% of Americans experience stress daily—making the United States one of the most stressed-out nations in the world. While some stress isn’t necessarily bad for employees’ health, chronic stress can cause negative long-term health effects. Employees will experience stress in all areas of their lives but consistently cite work as their top stressor. In fact, 64% of U.S. adults reported work as their top stressor in 2019.

This article compiles important information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.cdc.gov/covid-19 for more information.

This article contains important information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regarding quarantining after a COVID-19 exposure.

What Is a Quarantine?

A quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. It helps prevent spread of disease that can occur before a person knows they are sick or if they are infected with a virus without feeling symptoms. People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health and follow directions from their state or local health department.

AHR Insights Blog Headers businesses across the country continue reopening and the threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases looms, employers are facing difficult decisions regarding work-from-home arrangements.

Some employers are opting to extend work-from-home arrangements until next year, others are asking all employees to return to the office and some are offering a hybrid of the two models. For employers that are either reopening in phases or allowing some employees to continue to work from home during the pandemic, the question of who should continue working from home becomes a pressing issue. This article will provide an overview of best practices for employers to consider when determining which employees should continue to work from home during the pandemic.

As a result of the unprecedented challenges the COVID-19 pandemic brings, businesses must review their internal protocols to ensure they are doing all they can to protect their workforce and manage their operations.

This is particularly true as it relates to housekeeping and sanitation best practices, especially given how precise these procedures need to be, based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other health officials. This document provides an overview of cleaning recommendations from the CDC and includes a sample log that businesses can use during their cleaning and sanitization procedures.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe stigma around working from home has mostly been lifted as the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic abruptly shifted many employees into a remote work setting. Many organizations are expecting and planning more remote work for the foreseeable future.

Before the pandemic, common office perks included remote work opportunities and work schedule flexibility. Now, employees are starting to expect that from their current and future employers. Work perks related to food, wellness and technology are being introduced as employers rethink and adjust company culture. Perks should be more inclusive and easily used by any employee regardless of their work location.

HR Insights Blog HeaderAs we look into what the workplace will look like post-coronavirus, the reality for many employers may involve supporting a geographically distant workforce.

Some employees may be returning to an on-site work location, while others will be working remotely longer-term, or even permanently. Teams comprised of both remote and on-site employees may not only be the current reality—but the new normal. The expansion of remote work affects each organization uniquely, and employers can consider what actions may help bridge the gap between all employees.