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Governor Doug Ducey has issued Executive order 2020-12 prohibiting the closure of essential services. Download the complete "Executive order - Arizona Essential Services" Download sample 1 "COVID-19 Essential Employee Authorization Letter" Download sample 2 "Essential Worker Employee Communications Letter" - doc Download sample 3 "Essential Business Identification (COVID-19)" pdf    ...

Legal Update HeaderThe rapidly evolving COVID-19 situation has employers scrambling to deal with a variety of employment issues, many of which they’ve never previously encountered. We've compiled some of the employers' most common questions, including how the Families First Coronavirus Response Act affects employers, how to handle business closures, and what benefits are available to employees.

HR Compliance Bulletin headerAs part of sweeping legislation—the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)—signed into law by President Trump on March 18, 2020, two laws were enacted that provide workers with paid leave for reasons related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

  • The “Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act” allows 12 weeks of partially compensated FMLA leave to care for a child whose school or child care facility has been closed due to COVID-19.
  • The “Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act” requires employers to provide 80 hours of paid sick time to employees in specified circumstances related to COVID-19 exposure and prevention.

HR Compliance Bulletin headerAs part of sweeping legislation—the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)—signed into law by President Trump on March 18, 2020, two laws were enacted that provide workers with paid leave for reasons related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

  • The “Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act” allows 12 weeks of partially compensated FMLA leave to care for a child whose school or child care facility has been closed due to COVID-19.
  • The “Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act” requires employers to provide 80 hours of paid sick time to employees in specified circumstances related to COVID-19 exposure and prevention.

HR Compliance Bulletin headerThe Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)—signed into law by President Trump on March 18, 2020—requires certain employers to provide employees with expanded family and medical leave for specified reasons related to COVID-19. The Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division (WHD) administers and enforces the new law’s paid leave requirements. These provisions will apply from the effective date through Dec. 31, 2020.

The DOL is providing compliance assistance to employers and employees on their responsibilities and rights under the FFCRA. The following guidance was issued by the DOL regarding employee expanded family and medical leave rights under the law.

Safety Matters HeaderCoronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. It has spread from China to many other countries around the world, including the United States. Depending on the severity of COVID-19’s international impacts, outbreak conditions—including those rising to the level of a pandemic—can affect all aspects of daily life, including travel, trade, tourism, food supplies, and financial markets.

To reduce the impact of COVID-19 outbreak conditions on businesses, workers, customers, and the public, it is important for all employers to plan now for COVID-19. For employers who have already planned for influenza pandemics, planning for COVID-19 may involve updating plans to address the specific exposure risks, sources of exposure, routes of transmission, and other unique characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 (i.e., compared to pandemic influenza viruses). Employers who have not prepared for pandemic events should prepare themselves and their workers as far in advance as possible of potentially worsening outbreak conditions. Lack of continuity planning can result in a cascade of failures as employers attempt to address challenges of COVID-19 with insufficient resources and workers who might not be adequately trained for jobs they may have to perform under pandemic conditions.