COVID-19

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HR Insights Blog Header During the COVID-19 pandemic, hiring managers are struggling to get candidates in the door.

Recruiting budgets have been slashed and departments are wondering how to coordinate interviews, let alone find talent. How can teams adapt? The answer is virtual recruitment. Virtual recruitment is the process of pursuing, vetting, and onboarding candidates electronically. It’s been around for years, but, during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s proven to be one of the best methods for acquiring new talent. This article offers five tips for recruiters.

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Eight out of 10 COVID-19 deaths reported in the United States have been adults ages 65 years and older.

As you get older, your risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19 increases. It’s important for older adults and people with underlying medical conditions to take precautions to reduce their risk of getting COVID-19. The same goes for people who live or visit with those individuals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided guidance to help older adults reduce their risk of getting COVID-19 and navigate going out in public.

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HR Insights Blog Header Working remotely doesn’t always come naturally to employees, especially among those who are used to the accountability of in-person workplaces.

Remote work requires focus and restraint amid the countless distractions present in the home, and it lacks the socialization capabilities that come with physically going into the workplace. What’s more, remote employees often need to collaborate on different tasks. Without guidance, these conversations can become distracting and inefficient. With this in mind, employers may need to step in to help facilitate productivity and attentiveness—particularly when working in person isn’t an option, such as during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article provides four tips for supporting remote employee productivity while still enabling collaboration.

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The COVID-19 pandemic continues to bring forth a variety of questions for businesses. Employers can take a number of preventive steps to help keep employees safe, but they should also prepare to respond to various situations that can occur in the workplace.

This article provides COVID-19 general business FAQs from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These FAQs build on the CDC’s interim guidance for businesses and employers and its guidance for critical infrastructure workers. The CDC’s guidance is intended to supplement—not replace—federal, state and local mandates regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

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On March 12, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) launched a national emphasis program (NEP) for COVID-19.

OSHA establishes NEPs when it identifies a need to focus its resources to address particular hazards and high-hazard industries. This NEP will remain in effect for one year or until OSHA amends or cancels the program.

COVID-19 NEP

Prior OSHA guidance primarily addressed mitigating and limiting the spread of COVID-19. This NEP prioritizes the use of OSHA resources to eliminate and control workplace exposure to COVID-19.

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Office building employers, owners and managers can take proactive measures to create a safe and healthy workplace for employees, clients and other guests.

This article shares COVID-19 guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Protect Employees

Employers should consider the following steps to protect their employees and other building visitors, while slowing the spread of COVID-19:

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HR Compliance Bulletin header image The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), signed into law March 11, 2021, provides a 100% subsidy of premiums for employer-sponsored group health insurance continued under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (COBRA) and similar state continuation of coverage (mini-COBRA) programs.

ARPA subsidies cover the full cost of COBRA or mini-COBRA premiums from April 1, 2021, through Sept. 30, 2021, for employees (and their qualifying family members), if the employee lost or loses group health insurance due to an involuntary job loss or reduction in work hours.

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Attending gatherings increases your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. Generally speaking, the safest way to celebrate is to gather virtually, with people who live with you, or outside and at least 6 feet apart from others.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides guidance on ways to safely gather.

How to Make Small Gatherings Safer

The CDC recommends taking the following general steps to make small gatherings safer during the pandemic:

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News Brief header In a recent report, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released findings on mask mandates and on-premise dining at restaurants.

Notably, the research found that—within 20 days of implementation—mask mandates were associated with a decrease in daily COVID-19 case and death growth rates. In addition, the findings indicate that allowing on-premises restaurant dining was associated with an increase in daily COVID-19 case growth rates 41–100 days after mask mandate implementation and an increase in daily death growth rates 61–100 days after mask mandate implementation.

News Brief header The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released new guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine.

Such individuals have been given the go-ahead to resume many activities that have been on hold since the beginning of the pandemic.

What’s Changed

According to the CDC, people are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their second dose in a two-dose series, like the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine, like Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine. According to the guidance, people who have been fully vaccinated: