Employee Benefits

Fear, worry, and stress are normal responses to perceived or real threats, or when faced with uncertainty. Understandably so, it is normal that people are experiencing worry or stress during the coronavirus pandemic.

The coronavirus pandemic has affected nearly every aspect of daily life. Americans are increasingly suffering from behavioral health issues during the pandemic, including mental health issues and substance abuse. This can have a disastrous impact on workplace productivity. This article provides tips and considerations to help employers support their employees during this challenging time.

News Brief headerIn an interview with WebMD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield warned of the potential impact of a surge in COVID-19 cases this fall.

Redfield called on Americans to help bring the outbreak under control by participating in advised practices such as wearing a mask, washing hands, social distancing and avoiding crowds. Redfield also warned that “this could be the worst fall from a public health perspective, we've ever had” if COVID-19 preventive measures aren’t followed.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wage on, its effects on benefits planning for next year are being felt—especially as open enrollment season approaches.

According to Mercer's Global Survey #5, 20% of employers surveyed said updating benefits programs to better meet employee needs was an HR area in which companies are seeing an increased need for support. In addition to considering plan design changes, employers are having to evaluate and adjust their benefits packages for 2021. Some of the most common changes being made for the 2021 enrollment season are outlined in this article.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has changed employees’ daily lives and routines, and even as businesses reopen, many employees are feeling the effects of the pandemic. As businesses reopen, employers must consider how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected employees, which in turn will affect their post-coronavirus return to work.

As employees return to work, many are experiencing financial hardship, balancing new caregiving responsibilities, managing concerns over their physical well-being, and maintaining their mental well-being and health. During these uncertain times, employees are understandably experiencing significant stress, which can lead to lower productivity and morale, and increase their risk for health conditions, absenteeism and higher health care costs. To help employees navigate these times and ease their return to work, employers should consider offering or revamping an existing employee assistance program (EAP) to address post- coronavirus return-to-work concerns. EAPs can help employees tend to their personal needs, leaving you with healthier, happier and more productive employees.

The Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and the Treasury (Departments) have provided answers to a second set of frequently asked questions (FAQs Part 43) about health coverage issues related to COVID-19, including implementation of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and the...

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly decreased health care utilization, as health care providers and patients have canceled appointments and postponed elective procedures. Because employees are not using their insurance benefits, some group medical, dental and vision carriers are providing employers with a credit against future premiums...