Employee Benefits

The COVID-19 pandemic is not only challenging the way Americans live on a daily basis, but also posing significant economic threats that could have a lasting effect on their financial well-being.

Financial well-being is the state in which a person is able to meet their current and ongoing financial obligations, feel secure in their financial future and make choices that allow them to thrive. Many find the road to financial well-being to be tough, and the pandemic is likely creating additional obstacles on that path. This article explores the importance of financial well- being and how employers can help employees, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The COVID-19 Pandemic Has Upturned Everything This Year. So, It’s Understandable If You Are A Little Less Prepared For Open Enrollment At This Point. However, There’s Still Time To Address Open Enrollment With Employees In Meaningful Ways. Doing So Will Help Them Get The Most From Their Benefits, Which Are Especially Valuable In These Uncertain Times.

This article outlines a few last-minute strategies for maximizing open enrollment for your employees.

The arrival of the fall and winter months signals many things, including the beginning of flu season. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu activity peaks between December and February. This means that the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t the only public health concern as we approach the winter months.

This combination has public health experts fearing a potential “twindemic” in surges of COVID-19 cases and another deadly flu season. As such, the CDC is urging the public to take action to avoid another deadly flu season and prevent further spread of COVID-19 cases.

Open enrollment has always been a busy time for HR departments. Now, amid COVID-19, there are even greater challenges for employers to manage—one of the most significant being employee benefits communication.

Given that many employers are allowing telework, getting everyone on the same page about their benefits may not be easy. Below are some communication strategies to help.

Employers are responsible for educating their employees about the health coverage options they offer. Now, amid massive uncertainty caused by events such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the upcoming presidential election and the impending court case over the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), employees may be more stressed than ever about the status of their employee benefits.

That’s why it’s so critical to provide transparent and effective communication to employees about their benefits. Talking to Employees About Stressful Current Events Employees may be experiencing stress due to the uncertainty caused by the pandemic, the election and the status of the ACA. While you may not have all the answers, you can explain what’s going on and, if possible, how your organization is or will be responding. Consider the following talking points.

An unintentional phenomenon is on the rise—pandemic fatigue. Many people are tired of staying at home and want to be the social creatures they inherently are. In short, a lot of people want their “normal” back.

Pandemic fatigue occurs when people show low motivation or energy to comply with safety guidelines. In turn, this makes some Americans—consciously or unconsciously—disregard pandemic guidance such as social distancing, mask wearing and hand-washing. Others may be reaching a mental health breaking point.

The arrival of the fall and winter months signals many things, including the beginning of flu season. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu activity peaks between December and February. This means that the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t the only public health concern as we approach the winter months.

This combination has public health experts fearing a potential “twindemic” in surges of COVID-19 cases and another deadly flu season. As such, the CDC is urging the public to take action to avoid another deadly flu season and prevent further spread of COVID-19 cases.

Fear, worry, and stress are normal responses to perceived or real threats, or when faced with uncertainty. Understandably so, it is normal that people are experiencing worry or stress during the coronavirus pandemic.

The coronavirus pandemic has affected nearly every aspect of daily life. Americans are increasingly suffering from behavioral health issues during the pandemic, including mental health issues and substance abuse. This can have a disastrous impact on workplace productivity. This article provides tips and considerations to help employers support their employees during this challenging time.

News Brief headerIn an interview with WebMD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield warned of the potential impact of a surge in COVID-19 cases this fall.

Redfield called on Americans to help bring the outbreak under control by participating in advised practices such as wearing a mask, washing hands, social distancing and avoiding crowds. Redfield also warned that “this could be the worst fall from a public health perspective, we've ever had” if COVID-19 preventive measures aren’t followed.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wage on, its effects on benefits planning for next year are being felt—especially as open enrollment season approaches.

According to Mercer's Global Survey #5, 20% of employers surveyed said updating benefits programs to better meet employee needs was an HR area in which companies are seeing an increased need for support. In addition to considering plan design changes, employers are having to evaluate and adjust their benefits packages for 2021. Some of the most common changes being made for the 2021 enrollment season are outlined in this article.