Risk Management

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News Brief header U.S. health experts have identified an emerging strain of the coronavirus known as the Delta variant.

It was first seen in India, but has quickly moved across the globe. Experts predict it will soon be the dominant strain in the United States, already accounting for 10% of U.S. coronavirus cases. The good news is that existing COVID-19 vaccines seem to work well against the variant—drastically reducing the likelihood of hospitalization for vaccinated individuals.

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Legal Update Header On June 10, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced its COVID-19 Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS).

The ETS was developed to protect health care and health care support service workers from occupational exposure to COVID-19 in settings where people with COVID-19 are reasonably expected to be present. The ETS is expected to become effective as soon as it is published in the Federal Register.

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Legal Update Header On June 10, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated its guidance on mitigating and preventing the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace.

The guidance now focuses on protections for unvaccinated and otherwise at-risk employees. OSHA’s update to the guidance reflects the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for fully vaccinated people. This guidance emphasizes industries noted for prolonged close-contacts like meat processing, manufacturing, seafood, grocery and high-volume retail.

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Legal Update Header On May 21, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) updated its Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) guidance for recording COVID-19 vaccination adverse reactions.

The guidance now states that OSHA will not enforce the recording requirements to require any employers to record worker side effects from the COVID-19 vaccination through May 2022.

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Legal Update Header On May 18, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced it is reviewing the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations for fully vaccinated individuals.

OSHA has indicated it will update its Guidance on Mitigating and Preventing the Spread of COVID-19 in the Workplace and their National Emphasis Program for COVID-19 accordingly once the review is complete. Until then, the agency is referring employers to the CDC’s guidance for information on appropriate measures to protect fully vaccinated workers.

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Legal Update Header On Apr. 20, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provided guidance for recording COVID-19 vaccination adverse reactions.

The guidance comes in the format of frequently asked questions for adverse reactions under two scenarios: employer-required and voluntary vaccination.

Employer-required Vaccination

According to OSHA’s guidance, employers are required to record adverse reactions to the vaccine if the reactions are:

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News Brief header In a joint statement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have called for an immediate halt on the distribution of the Johnson & Johnson (J&J) COVID-19 vaccine.

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices will meet on Wednesday, April 14, to further review these cases and assess their potential significance. Until that process is complete, the agencies are recommending a pause in the use of the J&J vaccine out of an abundance of caution.

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News Brief header On Friday, April 2, 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced relaxed travel recommendations for vaccinated Americans.

The agency said that fully vaccinated individuals may resume travel at a low risk to themselves without tests or quarantines within the United States. Individuals are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after receiving their final vaccine dose. The CDC stressed that COVID-19 preventive measures should still be maintained during this time, including social distancing and mask-wearing, even for those who are fully vaccinated.

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Eight out of 10 COVID-19 deaths reported in the United States have been adults ages 65 years and older.

As you get older, your risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19 increases. It’s important for older adults and people with underlying medical conditions to take precautions to reduce their risk of getting COVID-19. The same goes for people who live or visit with those individuals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided guidance to help older adults reduce their risk of getting COVID-19 and navigate going out in public.