Human Resources White Papers

Legal Update HeaderUnder a new law enacted on Sept. 30, 2020, certain California employers must file an annual workforce pay data report with the state by March 31 every year.

The law applies to employers that have 100 or more employees and are required to file the federal Employer Information Report (EEO-1) with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The deadline for an employer’s initial report is March 31, 2021.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe COVID-19 pandemic changed the world within just a few months. As the crisis worsened, established processes were relaxed or abandoned in favor of maintaining operations. Among the most significant of these changes has been the increase in telework arrangements and the domino effect that it has caused.

Telework, or working from home, has risen steadily over the past several years, but it exploded amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Take, for instance, a 2017 Gallup poll that found that 43% of Americans worked remotely at least some of the time. Now, nearly that same percentage (42%) is working remotely full-time, according to a recent Stanford study.

HR Insights Blog HeaderAhead of elections, many employers want to encourage voter participation and are considering if any initiatives may be appropriate for their organization. While voting initiatives allow employers to help increase voter participation— these efforts can also bolster employee relations.

Because partisan political and voting initiatives risk divisiveness in the workplace, employers should focus on simply encouraging voter participation. This article outlines the impact of voting initiatives and various efforts that employers can consider to help educate employees and encourage them to vote.

Legal Update HeaderNew York City has amended its Earned Safe and Sick Time Act (ESST) to align with the state’s paid sick leave law (PSL), which was passed in April 2020 as part of the state budget. Both the amendments to the city ESST and the accrual and notice portions of the state law take effect Sept. 30, 2020.

The ESST amendments make a number of changes to the law, most notably how much leave must be provided by employers of different sizes, as follows:

HR Insights Blog HeaderPolitical discussion has and will continue to be a reality in many work environments. Work can already be a stressful place for many, with political discussion adding an additional stressor for employees—and in many cases, an additional concern for employers. While disagreement in and of itself isn’t always a detriment to all workplaces, political discussion can negatively affect the work environment for many employees.

This article addresses the impact that political discussion has in the workplace and steps that employers can consider to help keep political discussion civil. Read More Button    

Legal Update HeaderOn Sept. 22, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a proposed rule to clarify how employers should classify their workers as either employees or independent contractors.

Accurate worker classification enables employers to determine which obligations, protections, rights and benefits apply to their employees under the law. Read More Button    

Legal Update HeaderOn Sept. 4, 2020, California amended the list of occupations exempted from using the state’s employee classification test, also known as “the ABC test” (AB 5). When the ABC test is not required, including when an exemption applies, employers may need to revert to previous methods to determine whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor.

Modified List of Exempt Occupations

The amendments modified the business-to-business, referral agency and freelance writer exemptions. The amendments also added the following new exemptions (see full text for details):