Human Resources White Papers

Legal Update HeaderOn Aug. 17, 2020, a federal district court granted an injunction blocking a Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) regulation that would have allowed health care and insurance discrimination based on sex stereotyping, gender identity and pregnancy-related conditions.

ACA Section 1557 Regulations

Under Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), discrimination on the “basis of sex” is prohibited in “any health program or activity” that receives federal funds or is administered by a federal agency.

Legal Update HeaderOn July 21, 2020, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a decision that eases the way for employers to discipline or discharge an employee based on abusive or offensive conduct—such as racist or profane remarks— committed while the employee was also engaged in activities that are protected under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

Uniform Standard

The decision means that, in any NLRB case in which an employee who engaged in abusive or offensive conduct claims he or she was disciplined for NLRA-protected activity, the employer may show that its adverse employment action was lawful by proving that:
  • The employee’s protected activity was not a motivating factor in the discipline or discharge; and
  • It would have taken the same action even in the absence of the protected activity (for example, by showing consistent discipline of other employees who engaged in similar conduct).

HR Insights Blog HeaderEveryone knows that name-calling, teasing and other bullying behavior is unwelcome in the workplace.

But what if the comments are veiled in humor? Jokes about “old farts” or “screen-obsessed millennials” might seem like acceptable office banter to some, but these comments may amount to ageism and could seriously impact an organization—and should be quickly snuffed out when noticed.
This article explains some of the ways offhand comments can affect a workplace and outlines steps employers can take to combat their spread.
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HR Insights Blog HeaderThis toolkit serves as an introduction to workplace stress and provides several ways that employers can address and mitigate stress in the workplace. It is not intended as legal or medical advice and should only be used for informational purposes.

Introduction

According to a Gallup poll, 55% of Americans experience stress daily—making the United States one of the most stressed-out nations in the world. While some stress isn’t necessarily bad for employees’ health, chronic stress can cause negative long-term health effects. Employees will experience stress in all areas of their lives but consistently cite work as their top stressor. In fact, 64% of U.S. adults reported work as their top stressor in 2019.

Legal Update HeaderOn July 21, 2020, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a decision that eases the way for employers to discipline or discharge an employee based on abusive or offensive conduct—such as racist or profane remarks— committed while the employee was also engaged in activities that are protected under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

Legal Update HeaderThe U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) about federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) regulations. The RFI, released July 16, 2020, invites interested parties who have knowledge of or experience with the FMLA to submit comments, information, and data on the effectiveness of the regulations in meeting the objectives of the statute.

Even though the brain and the heart are located far from one another in the body, they are intrinsically connected and have a significant impact on how each other functions.

The two organs communicate via the muscular walls around the heart, which are connected to the brain in the circulatory system. As the brain releases hormones telling the body what to do, receptor cells in your blood vessels pick up these messages. In addition, there are nerve endings that travel from the brain to the muscular walls of the heart. These nerves send messages to the muscle tissue to either relax or contract.