Property & Casualty White Papers

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There are numerous factors that can contribute to higher workers’ compensation expenses for an organization. Specifically, one emerging cost driver is the concern of comorbidities.

A comorbidity occurs when an individual experiences multiple health conditions at the same time. The presence of comorbidities within your workforce can carry significant consequences—namely, elevating the severity of workplace injuries and lengthening employees’ recovery time following an injury. These ramifications can, in turn, lead to an increase in both the overall cost and complexity of workers’ compensation claims.

News Brief headerWhile any workers’ compensation claims can result in costly ramifications for your organization, one category of claim in particular—known as a “mega claim”—has the potential to carry significant consequences.

True to its name, a mega claim is characterized as an exceptionally large claim— typically totaling $3 million or more in incurred losses. In the realm of workers’ compensation, these claims usually stem from employees experiencing severe injuries or illnesses on the job. Mega claims are not only expensive, but often lengthier and more complex in nature than a typical claim. Such claims can leave lasting impacts on your employees by way of life-altering injuries and illnesses, as well as your overall organization through hefty costs, lost time and the potential for severe reputational damage.

Excess liability insurance (ELI), more commonly known as umbrella insurance, is one of the most important types of insurance your company can buy.

It protects your business from holes or limits in existing policy coverage as well as from financially draining lawsuits. Just as you carry an umbrella to protect you from a potential downpour, ELI protects your company from the types of claims that could close your business.

No matter what industry you’re in, chances are your organization will, at some point, rely on the help of a third party to fulfill certain business needs. Regardless of who you work with, business arrangements with contractors and vendors can open you up to a number of risks—risks that need to be accounted for through insurance.

However, when accounting for risks related to contracted work, securing your own insurance is not always enough. It’s critical that your partners are covered as well. This is particularly important when you consider that, following an incident involving a contractor or vendor, your business could be the one held liable for any damages that occur. To protect against this sort of risk, many organizations turn to certificates of insurance (COIs).