Risk Management White Papers

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News Brief header The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) recently published a report concerning the role that large trucks play when traveling through work zones.

In conjunction with National Work Zone Awareness Week, which is taking place April 26-30 this year, the FMCSA is specifically focusing on the number of large trucks that are involved in fatal crashes within work zones.

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News Brief header Wildfire Community Preparedness Day is Saturday, May 1, 2021. This national event is managed by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and encourages people and organizations to come together to promote wildfire awareness and participate in projects to reduce wildfire risks.

In-person gatherings continue to be limited in many areas of the country due to COVID-19. As a result, this year’s event will focus on what people can do around their homes and properties to protect against the threat of wildfires.

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Risk Insights header image A wide range of industrial organizations generate waste oil—which is considered any synthetic- or petroleum-based oil (e.g., fuel oil, motor oil, hydraulic oil or transmission fluid) that’s no longer able to be used for its intended purpose—within their operations.

Such oil typically reaches this state by way of breaking down over time, possessing impurities, or becoming overly exposed to natural elements.

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Safety Matters Header image According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), falls from elevation account for the majority of fatalities within the construction industry—with over 300 fatal falls occurring each year.

That’s why having adequate fall protection is crucial when working from height. OSHA standards require some form of fall protection (e.g., guardrails, safety nets or fall arrest systems) to be in place at construction sites with vertical drops of 6 feet or more—except for certain tasks, such as scaffolding, in which vertical drops must exceed 10 feet before protection is needed. The type of fall protection necessary depends on several site features and the nature of work being performed.

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Risk Insights header image The type of sprinkler system that best suits your commercial property should be determined by your operations, building characteristics and fire protection needs.

Wet pipe sprinkler systems, which store water in their pipes for distribution during a fire, are the most commonly utilized systems. Alternatively, some buildings (typically those located in areas where the pipes cannot remain at temperatures above 40 degrees Fahrenheit) use dry pipe sprinkler systems, which hold pressurized air or nitrogen in their pipes that—once released—open a valve and distribute water from the risers.

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Risk Insights header image The nature and severity of fire hazards within a commercial property can help determine what kind of sprinkler system is most suitable for the space.

Most properties utilize either wet pipe sprinkler systems, which store water directly in their pipes for distribution during a fire, or dry pipe sprinkler systems, which hold pressurized air or nitrogen in their pipes that—once released—open a valve and allow water from the risers to be distributed.

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At the end of March 2021, President Joe Biden introduced a new infrastructure proposal—titled the American Jobs Plan—which is focused on re-establishing the country’s economy.

This proposal is the second component of the Biden Administration’s larger, three-part infrastructure package, known as the Build Back Better Plan. The American Jobs Plan is preceded by the American Rescue Plan and will eventually be followed by the American Families Plan. While the American Rescue Plan is currently providing direct relief to individuals and businesses affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Jobs Plan is intended to help revitalize the national economy for years to come.

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Risk Insights header image A wide range of organizations—including car dealerships, mechanics, auto body shops, gas stations and numerous retailers—keep tires stored at their commercial properties.

However, such storage can result in serious fire hazards. Specifically, the rubber material typically found in tires can be extremely dangerous and damaging in the event of a fire. Although this material is slower to ignite, it can burn rapidly and emit high heat once a fire starts—making the flames difficult to extinguish.

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Slips, trips, and falls are a leading cause of insurance claims for businesses, affecting virtually every industry.

A look inside Advisen’s database shows which industries and states have the highest frequency and severity of these claims. Looking at general liability losses in Advisen’s loss database that contain the words “slip,” “trip” or “fall,” the construction industry had the greatest frequency of losses, followed by retail trade and real estate.