Employee Benefits Tag

Trends at a glance headerA wellness program is an organized program intended to assist employees and family members in making voluntary behavior changes that reduce their health risks and enhance their individual productivity.

Wellness programs vary widely in design and may offer opportunities or incentives for improving health and wellness, such as increasing fitness, losing weight, managing chronic health conditions or quitting smoking.    

HR Insights Blog HeaderEach year, the seasonal flu has a marked impact on businesses and employers, causing increased absenteeism, decreased productivity and higher health care costs. The past few flu seasons have seen high hospitalization and mortality rates, which has public health experts fearing another deadly flu season.

Unfortunately, the 2020-21 flu season isn’t the only health crisis employers and employees have to address this year. The COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting the workforce, and the combination of another potentially bad flu season and the pandemic has public health experts worried. As an employer, you are well-positioned to help keep your employees healthy and minimize the impact that influenza has on your business. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends strategies to help employers fight the flu and talk to employees about what a flu season during the pandemic looks like.

The arrival of the fall and winter months signals many things, including the beginning of flu season. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu activity peaks between December and February. This means that the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t the only public health concern as we approach the winter months.

This combination has public health experts fearing a potential “twindemic” in surges of COVID-19 cases and another deadly flu season. As such, the CDC is urging the public to take action to avoid another deadly flu season and prevent further spread of COVID-19 cases.

Open enrollment has always been a busy time for HR departments. Now, amid COVID-19, there are even greater challenges for employers to manage—one of the most significant being employee benefits communication.

Given that many employers are allowing telework, getting everyone on the same page about their benefits may not be easy. Below are some communication strategies to help.

According to the Bone and Joint Initiative USA, nearly 1 in 2 Americans over the age of 18—or 124 million people—have a musculoskeletal disorder. And, according to OSHA, work-related musculoskeletal disorders are among the most common disability claims.

What are musculoskeletal disorders?

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) refer to a variety of conditions that affect your joints, bones and muscles. According to the World Health Organization, there are more than 150 conditions that are considered MSDs, the most common being osteoarthritis, back and neck pain, fractures and systemic inflammatory conditions (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis).

Employers are responsible for educating their employees about the health coverage options they offer. Now, amid massive uncertainty caused by events such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the upcoming presidential election and the impending court case over the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), employees may be more stressed than ever about the status of their employee benefits.

That’s why it’s so critical to provide transparent and effective communication to employees about their benefits. Talking to Employees About Stressful Current Events Employees may be experiencing stress due to the uncertainty caused by the pandemic, the election and the status of the ACA. While you may not have all the answers, you can explain what’s going on and, if possible, how your organization is or will be responding. Consider the following talking points.

The arrival of the fall and winter months signals many things, including the beginning of flu season. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), flu activity peaks between December and February. This means that the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t the only public health concern as we approach the winter months.

This combination has public health experts fearing a potential “twindemic” in surges of COVID-19 cases and another deadly flu season. As such, the CDC is urging the public to take action to avoid another deadly flu season and prevent further spread of COVID-19 cases.

Fear, worry, and stress are normal responses to perceived or real threats, or when faced with uncertainty. Understandably so, it is normal that people are experiencing worry or stress during the coronavirus pandemic.

The coronavirus pandemic has affected nearly every aspect of daily life. Americans are increasingly suffering from behavioral health issues during the pandemic, including mental health issues and substance abuse. This can have a disastrous impact on workplace productivity. This article provides tips and considerations to help employers support their employees during this challenging time.

Employers that sponsor group health plans should provide certain benefit notices in connection with their plans’ open enrollment periods. Some of these notices must be provided at open enrollment time, such as the summary of benefits and coverage (SBC). Other notices, such as the Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act (WHCRA) notice, must be distributed annually. Although these annual notices may be provided at different times throughout the year, employers often choose to include them in their open enrollment materials for administrative convenience.