Employee Retention Tag

[wpseo_breadcrumb]

HR Insights Blog Header Working remotely doesn’t always come naturally to employees, especially among those who are used to the accountability of in-person workplaces.

Remote work requires focus and restraint amid the countless distractions present in the home, and it lacks the socialization capabilities that come with physically going into the workplace. What’s more, remote employees often need to collaborate on different tasks. Without guidance, these conversations can become distracting and inefficient. With this in mind, employers may need to step in to help facilitate productivity and attentiveness—particularly when working in person isn’t an option, such as during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article provides four tips for supporting remote employee productivity while still enabling collaboration.

The foods and beverages you consume have a significant impact on your health. Diet-related chronic diseases—such as cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, obesity and some types of cancer—are prevalent among Americans and pose a major public health problem.

In fact, 60% of adults have one or more diet-related chronic diseases. Every five years, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture publish nutrition advice. The newest version of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2020-2025) offers science-based nutrition advice to develop healthy eating habits and reduce chronic disease risk. For the first time, this edition provides recommendations by life stage, from birth through older adulthood.

Attraction and Retention Challenges amid COVID-19 header Attracting and retaining talent is often a top priority for HR departments.

Given the effect the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the job market, one might imagine this task is easier than ever. Unfortunately, that’s far from the truth. While there may be more candidates than usual, attracting quality talent and retaining top performers still remains a struggle, worsened by COVID-19 and its effects on the workplace. This article shares some tips for attracting and retaining workers amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wellness image

After a year that was turned upside down by the COVID-19 pandemic, many aspects of the workplace have changed, including employer sponsored wellness programs.

Prior to the pandemic, employers were already making a shift to the way they viewed and implemented wellness initiatives at their organization. Some of these changes included focusing on holistic well-being and bolstering mental health offerings.

Legal Update Header

On Jan. 1, 2021, Colorado employers will have to provide workers with up to 80 hours of paid public health emergency leave (PHEL) under the state’s new Healthy Families and Workplaces Act.

The requirement was clarified in guidance and temporary emergency rules issued by the state’s Department of Labor and Employment (DLE) on Dec. 23, 2020.

Your Wellness Matters header image

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed many aspects of daily life—including how employees
celebrate the holidays.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urged all Americans to avoid gathering and traveling for the Thanksgiving holiday, and these sentiments will likely apply to future holiday celebrations as well. This may include—but is not limited to—Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa and New Year’s Eve.