Employee Retention Tag

HR Insights Blog HeaderIn light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many organizations are taking precautions to best ensure the health and safety of their workforce. As return-to-work plans are implemented, employees are also concerned about safety—and are often addressing concerns directly with their employers.

As organizations address new challenges, many are seeking answers regarding what they can, and cannot do in response to common return-to-work concerns. This article serves as a general guide for employers regarding safety and workplace precautions as organizations prepare and implement return-to-work plans, and prepare to address common concerns as employees return to the workplace.

HR Insights Blog HeaderIn response to the COVID-19 pandemic, day cares and schools shut their doors. Months later, child care centers remain closed in many parts of the country, which means that parents are tasked with juggling caregiving and work responsibilities.

In fact, according to a survey from Boston Consulting Group (BCG), 60% of U.S. parents report that they’ve had no outside help with child care during the pandemic.

HR Insights Blog HeaderEveryone knows that name-calling, teasing and other bullying behavior is unwelcome in the workplace.

But what if the comments are veiled in humor? Jokes about “old farts” or “screen-obsessed millennials” might seem like acceptable office banter to some, but these comments may amount to ageism and could seriously impact an organization—and should be quickly snuffed out when noticed.
This article explains some of the ways offhand comments can affect a workplace and outlines steps employers can take to combat their spread.
Read More Button

HR Insights Blog HeaderThis toolkit serves as an introduction to workplace stress and provides several ways that employers can address and mitigate stress in the workplace. It is not intended as legal or medical advice and should only be used for informational purposes.

Introduction

According to a Gallup poll, 55% of Americans experience stress daily—making the United States one of the most stressed-out nations in the world. While some stress isn’t necessarily bad for employees’ health, chronic stress can cause negative long-term health effects. Employees will experience stress in all areas of their lives but consistently cite work as their top stressor. In fact, 64% of U.S. adults reported work as their top stressor in 2019.

AHR Insights Blog Headers businesses across the country continue reopening and the threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases looms, employers are facing difficult decisions regarding work-from-home arrangements.

Some employers are opting to extend work-from-home arrangements until next year, others are asking all employees to return to the office and some are offering a hybrid of the two models. For employers that are either reopening in phases or allowing some employees to continue to work from home during the pandemic, the question of who should continue working from home becomes a pressing issue. This article will provide an overview of best practices for employers to consider when determining which employees should continue to work from home during the pandemic.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe stigma around working from home has mostly been lifted as the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic abruptly shifted many employees into a remote work setting. Many organizations are expecting and planning more remote work for the foreseeable future.

Before the pandemic, common office perks included remote work opportunities and work schedule flexibility. Now, employees are starting to expect that from their current and future employers. Work perks related to food, wellness and technology are being introduced as employers rethink and adjust company culture. Perks should be more inclusive and easily used by any employee regardless of their work location.

HR Insights Blog HeaderAs we look into what the workplace will look like post-coronavirus, the reality for many employers may involve supporting a geographically distant workforce.

Some employees may be returning to an on-site work location, while others will be working remotely longer-term, or even permanently. Teams comprised of both remote and on-site employees may not only be the current reality—but the new normal. The expansion of remote work affects each organization uniquely, and employers can consider what actions may help bridge the gap between all employees.