Employee Retention Tag

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There are numerous factors that can contribute to higher workers’ compensation expenses for an organization. Specifically, one emerging cost driver is the concern of comorbidities.

A comorbidity occurs when an individual experiences multiple health conditions at the same time. The presence of comorbidities within your workforce can carry significant consequences—namely, elevating the severity of workplace injuries and lengthening employees’ recovery time following an injury. These ramifications can, in turn, lead to an increase in both the overall cost and complexity of workers’ compensation claims.

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On Nov. 3, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published two new opinion letters providing the DOL’s official position on how the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) applies to employee pay when there is work-related travel or employee training.

Voluntary Training Programs

The FLSA requires employers to compensate their employees for all hours of work. While the FLSA does not define what qualifies as “work,” the U.S. Supreme Court has determined that employees should be compensated for any time that “is spent predominantly for the employer’s benefit.”

The COVID-19 pandemic is not only challenging the way Americans live on a daily basis, but also posing significant economic threats that could have a lasting effect on their financial well-being.

Financial well-being is the state in which a person is able to meet their current and ongoing financial obligations, feel secure in their financial future and make choices that allow them to thrive. Many find the road to financial well-being to be tough, and the pandemic is likely creating additional obstacles on that path. This article explores the importance of financial well- being and how employers can help employees, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

HR Insights Blog HeaderA successful business is all about accountability. Each worker’s individual contributions build on one another and culminate into something greater, to the benefit of the company and its customers.

Conversely, when some individuals struggle with their performance, the entire organization can suffer. Unfortunately, addressing poor performance isn’t always easy. This is especially true amid the COVID- 19 pandemic, as remote working often makes accountability more complicated. This article offers five tips to help employers manage poor performance in the workplace, even while everyone is working from home.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe Time We’re Living In Now Is Not Like Any Other Period From Recent Memory. Between The COVID-19 Pandemic, Global Economic Downturns And Lingering Job Shortages, It’s Safe To Say That We’re All Charting Unknown Waters.

It can seem like entire processes and workflows have gone out the window— sacrificed for the sake of staying afloat. And performance reviews are among the greatest casualties.

The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly changed many aspects of the modern workplace—and some of those changes may continue in perpetuity after the pandemic is over. One aspect that falls into this category is paid leave programs.

Many employers across the country are changing paid leave programs to comply with applicable federal, state or local guidelines during the pandemic and support employees through these challenging times. In fact, according to data from Mercer, 49% of surveyed employers have adjusted their sick leave programs due to COVID-19-related absences and about 12% have expanded employees’ time off to show their appreciation.

The need for social distancing has put a pause on normal socializing activities, like family get-togethers, restaurant outings and music concerts.

As the pandemic continues, social distancing doesn’t need to mean social isolation. If you don’t address it, isolation and loneliness during the pandemic may pose a risk to your mental health.

Why It Matters

Social connectivity is the feeling of closeness and connectedness to a community. Every connection has a lasting impact on our physical and mental health—so it’s especially important during this time to focus on connectivity to support both yourself and others in your community.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe COVID-19 pandemic changed the world within just a few months. As the crisis worsened, established processes were relaxed or abandoned in favor of maintaining operations. Among the most significant of these changes has been the increase in telework arrangements and the domino effect that it has caused.

Telework, or working from home, has risen steadily over the past several years, but it exploded amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Take, for instance, a 2017 Gallup poll that found that 43% of Americans worked remotely at least some of the time. Now, nearly that same percentage (42%) is working remotely full-time, according to a recent Stanford study.

HR Insights Blog HeaderTime theft in the workplace is a common and expensive problem across industries. And, if not addressed, it can cost employers time, money and customers.

In fact, the American Payroll Association found that 75% of businesses in the United States are affected by time theft every year. Another study estimates that time theft costs U.S. employers more than $400 billion per year in lost productivity. When employees are working remotely, it’s harder to detect and prevent all types of fraud. This article explores the risk of time theft and explains how to prevent time or schedule abuse among remote employees.