Mental Wellbeing Tag

HR Insights Blog HeaderIn response to the COVID-19 pandemic, day cares and schools shut their doors. Months later, child care centers remain closed in many parts of the country, which means that parents are tasked with juggling caregiving and work responsibilities.

In fact, according to a survey from Boston Consulting Group (BCG), 60% of U.S. parents report that they’ve had no outside help with child care during the pandemic.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThis toolkit serves as an introduction to workplace stress and provides several ways that employers can address and mitigate stress in the workplace. It is not intended as legal or medical advice and should only be used for informational purposes.

Introduction

According to a Gallup poll, 55% of Americans experience stress daily—making the United States one of the most stressed-out nations in the world. While some stress isn’t necessarily bad for employees’ health, chronic stress can cause negative long-term health effects. Employees will experience stress in all areas of their lives but consistently cite work as their top stressor. In fact, 64% of U.S. adults reported work as their top stressor in 2019.

Even though the brain and the heart are located far from one another in the body, they are intrinsically connected and have a significant impact on how each other functions.

The two organs communicate via the muscular walls around the heart, which are connected to the brain in the circulatory system. As the brain releases hormones telling the body what to do, receptor cells in your blood vessels pick up these messages. In addition, there are nerve endings that travel from the brain to the muscular walls of the heart. These nerves send messages to the muscle tissue to either relax or contract.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has upended the entire world, it seems. With fluctuating infection rates and conflicting official guidance, organizations will need to adapt quickly if they want to succeed in the post-coronavirus landscape.

HR teams stand at the forefront of these efforts. For years, HR departments have been tasked with ushering in fundamental workplace changes, and this moment is no different. This article includes five ways the coronavirus is reshaping HR and how departments can adapt to these new challenges.

HR Insights Blog HeaderMany employers seek the benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace, but struggle to overcome challenges such as bias.

While most leaders and most employees strive to make fair decisions and avoid unfair judgments, there exists the possibility that bias impacts some workplaces. Employers may be able to help mitigate bias in a number of ways, such as establishing a dialogue with employees, offering educational opportunities and evaluating current practices.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe COVID-19 pandemic has tested the well-being of employees everywhere. In addition to the physical and mental stress the coronavirus has caused, many workers are experiencing a financial strain as well. As such, employers should continue to consider how their total rewards packages resonate with the current employment market.

Employee retention and recruitment continue to be the most common workplace challenges for employers and HR professionals. This article explores factors to consider when planning salary and total rewards to help attract and retain a skilled workforce post-coronavirus.

HR Insights Blog HeaderGrief is a natural reaction to the loss of a loved one. The side effects are well-known, including intense sadness, depression and irritability—just to name a few. When employees are grieving, it can be difficult for them to focus on anything other than their loss.

In fact, the Grief Recovery Institute found that grieving workers cost employers between $75 billion and $100 billion annually through lost productivity and absenteeism. That’s not surprising, given that 85% of workers said grief affects their decision making capabilities and productivity levels, according to the same report.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has caused uncertainty, stress and worry for many for the past few weeks. Even as businesses reopen and restrictions are lifted, many Americans are experiencing considerable anxiety.

With more than half of Americans reporting to Dynata, a survey insights firm, that they think the COVID-19 pandemic will last six months or more, many health experts are concerned about the nation’s mental health. In fact, according to a recent Gallup poll, nearly 60% of US adults reported daily stress and worry due to the pandemic. While experiencing stress or anxiety over the health and economic fears brought on by COVID-19 is normal, if you don’t take steps to cope with these feelings, you can put yourself at risk for long-term health effects.

Legal Update HeaderThe Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed updates to a self-compliance tool to help improve compliance with the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA). The MHPAEA requires parity between a group health plan’s mental health and substance use disorder (MH/SUD) benefits and medical and surgical benefits.

Proposed Changes

Federal law directs the DOL to make a document publicly available to improve compliance with MHPAEA, and to update this document every two years. The DOL last updated the MHPAEA self-compliance tool in April 2018. The proposed updates to the self-compliance tool include:

This Live Well, Work Well article provides quick tips for coping with coronavirus-related stress and anxiety.

If you’re feeling stressed and anxious during these uncertain times, you’re not alone. According to a recent Gallup poll, nearly 60% of Americans reported daily stress and worry due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. While experiencing stress or anxiety over the health and economic fears brought on by COVID-19 is normal, if you don’t take steps to cope with these feelings, you can put yourself at risk for long-term health effects.