Remote Work Tag

On Aug. 24, 2020, the U.SLegal Update Header. Department of Labor (DOL) issued Field Assistance Bulletin No. 2020-5 to remind employers of their obligation to accurately account for the number of hours their employees work away from the employer’s facilities.

While the bulletin was issued in response to the high number of employees working remotely because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the DOL is also reminding employers that the underlying principles apply to other telework or remote work arrangements. Read More Button    

Open enrollment following the COVID-19 pandemic will be unlike any other in recent memory.

Many organizations are still trying to recover from extended closures and maintain safe working environments—open enrollment is the last thing on their minds. Yet, procrastinating on enrollment planning can actually cause more issues than it solves. This article explains what employers can expect this enrollment period and how to prepare.

Open enrollment fairs are a great way for employers and benefits providers to help employees understand and enroll in the benefits programs that meet their needs.

These fairs are typically done in person, and they allow employees to learn about available benefits and discuss offerings with providers. Just as the COVID-19 pandemic may be changing what employees need for benefits, the format of open enrollment events should change, too. With open enrollment season around the corner and many organizations extending work-from-home policies, a virtual open enrollment fair may be necessary. This article explores benefits and best practices for organizations moving their open enrollment events online.

AHR Insights Blog Headers businesses across the country continue reopening and the threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases looms, employers are facing difficult decisions regarding work-from-home arrangements.

Some employers are opting to extend work-from-home arrangements until next year, others are asking all employees to return to the office and some are offering a hybrid of the two models. For employers that are either reopening in phases or allowing some employees to continue to work from home during the pandemic, the question of who should continue working from home becomes a pressing issue. This article will provide an overview of best practices for employers to consider when determining which employees should continue to work from home during the pandemic.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe stigma around working from home has mostly been lifted as the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic abruptly shifted many employees into a remote work setting. Many organizations are expecting and planning more remote work for the foreseeable future.

Before the pandemic, common office perks included remote work opportunities and work schedule flexibility. Now, employees are starting to expect that from their current and future employers. Work perks related to food, wellness and technology are being introduced as employers rethink and adjust company culture. Perks should be more inclusive and easily used by any employee regardless of their work location.

HR Insights Blog HeaderAs we look into what the workplace will look like post-coronavirus, the reality for many employers may involve supporting a geographically distant workforce.

Some employees may be returning to an on-site work location, while others will be working remotely longer-term, or even permanently. Teams comprised of both remote and on-site employees may not only be the current reality—but the new normal. The expansion of remote work affects each organization uniquely, and employers can consider what actions may help bridge the gap between all employees.