Remote Work Tag

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Encouraging remote work has become a new normal for a variety of reasons.

Whether it is to reduce costs of operating a physical place of business, address pandemic reasons or allow employees to have a better work-life balance, more and more workers are working from home. However, many organizations are not aware of how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) oversees injuries that occur at an employee’s home. OSHA has provided guidance on how to deal with remote worker injuries and inspections.

The COVID-19 pandemic has solidified remote work as a new operational standard.

Employers should expect this trend to only grow in the future. In fact, many major companies, such as Twitter and Microsoft, have indicated that remote work will be an indefinite option for their employees.

While this is exciting in many ways, remote work also comes with unique challenges—namely, cybersecurity. This article discusses some cybersecurity risks that remote employees face and offers potential solutions.

The Vision Council reported that more than 70% of Americans don’t know—or don’t believe—that they could suffer from eye strain.

The reality is that most adults are on digital media for about four to six hours each day. If your job involves working on a computer and you’ve been logging on from home, you may be racking up even more hours than normal in front of a brightly lit screen.

HR Insights Blog HeaderA successful business is all about accountability. Each worker’s individual contributions build on one another and culminate into something greater, to the benefit of the company and its customers.

Conversely, when some individuals struggle with their performance, the entire organization can suffer. Unfortunately, addressing poor performance isn’t always easy. This is especially true amid the COVID- 19 pandemic, as remote working often makes accountability more complicated. This article offers five tips to help employers manage poor performance in the workplace, even while everyone is working from home.

Working from home has grown more popular than ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it can make the workday more flexible and safe, it poses challenges for employees and employers alike. In particular, challenges regarding social well-being and connectivity are among some of the top concerns with working remotely.

Although it’s tough, there are some ways to stay connected while working from home.

What Is Social Well-being?

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe Time We’re Living In Now Is Not Like Any Other Period From Recent Memory. Between The COVID-19 Pandemic, Global Economic Downturns And Lingering Job Shortages, It’s Safe To Say That We’re All Charting Unknown Waters.

It can seem like entire processes and workflows have gone out the window— sacrificed for the sake of staying afloat. And performance reviews are among the greatest casualties.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe COVID-19 pandemic changed the world within just a few months. As the crisis worsened, established processes were relaxed or abandoned in favor of maintaining operations. Among the most significant of these changes has been the increase in telework arrangements and the domino effect that it has caused.

Telework, or working from home, has risen steadily over the past several years, but it exploded amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Take, for instance, a 2017 Gallup poll that found that 43% of Americans worked remotely at least some of the time. Now, nearly that same percentage (42%) is working remotely full-time, according to a recent Stanford study.

HR Insights Blog HeaderTerminations aren’t easy, and the current pandemic is causing new challenges for the process. Conducting terminations in-person may be the standard procedure for many organizations, but with more employees working remotely than ever before, an in-person termination isn’t always feasible—or might be logistically impractical.

When conducting remote terminations, having an effective process in place can ease this difficult task and reduce risk for an employer. This article offers considerations for conducting a remote termination. Employers should ensure that those involved with terminations are aware of all applicable laws. The considerations outlined in this article are not legal advice. Laws and guidelines related to terminations may vary by locality. Employers should consult with local legal counsel for any termination-related issues.