Remote Work Tag

HR Insights Blog HeaderA successful business is all about accountability. Each worker’s individual contributions build on one another and culminate into something greater, to the benefit of the company and its customers.

Conversely, when some individuals struggle with their performance, the entire organization can suffer. Unfortunately, addressing poor performance isn’t always easy. This is especially true amid the COVID- 19 pandemic, as remote working often makes accountability more complicated. This article offers five tips to help employers manage poor performance in the workplace, even while everyone is working from home.

Working from home has grown more popular than ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it can make the workday more flexible and safe, it poses challenges for employees and employers alike. In particular, challenges regarding social well-being and connectivity are among some of the top concerns with working remotely.

Although it’s tough, there are some ways to stay connected while working from home.

What Is Social Well-being?

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe Time We’re Living In Now Is Not Like Any Other Period From Recent Memory. Between The COVID-19 Pandemic, Global Economic Downturns And Lingering Job Shortages, It’s Safe To Say That We’re All Charting Unknown Waters.

It can seem like entire processes and workflows have gone out the window— sacrificed for the sake of staying afloat. And performance reviews are among the greatest casualties.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe COVID-19 pandemic changed the world within just a few months. As the crisis worsened, established processes were relaxed or abandoned in favor of maintaining operations. Among the most significant of these changes has been the increase in telework arrangements and the domino effect that it has caused.

Telework, or working from home, has risen steadily over the past several years, but it exploded amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Take, for instance, a 2017 Gallup poll that found that 43% of Americans worked remotely at least some of the time. Now, nearly that same percentage (42%) is working remotely full-time, according to a recent Stanford study.

HR Insights Blog HeaderTerminations aren’t easy, and the current pandemic is causing new challenges for the process. Conducting terminations in-person may be the standard procedure for many organizations, but with more employees working remotely than ever before, an in-person termination isn’t always feasible—or might be logistically impractical.

When conducting remote terminations, having an effective process in place can ease this difficult task and reduce risk for an employer. This article offers considerations for conducting a remote termination. Employers should ensure that those involved with terminations are aware of all applicable laws. The considerations outlined in this article are not legal advice. Laws and guidelines related to terminations may vary by locality. Employers should consult with local legal counsel for any termination-related issues.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the stigma associated with working remotely has disappeared. And, as the pandemic continues, working from home is likely to stick around.

If you haven’t already, it’s important to assess how you’re doing working from home and whether you need to make adjustments. Distractions are all around, regardless of whether you are in the workplace or in the comfort of your home. Both work settings have their own set of productivity killers, and a lot can hinge on an employee’s personal ability to avoid distractions.

On Aug. 24, 2020, the U.SLegal Update Header. Department of Labor (DOL) issued Field Assistance Bulletin No. 2020-5 to remind employers of their obligation to accurately account for the number of hours their employees work away from the employer’s facilities.

While the bulletin was issued in response to the high number of employees working remotely because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the DOL is also reminding employers that the underlying principles apply to other telework or remote work arrangements. Read More Button    

Open enrollment following the COVID-19 pandemic will be unlike any other in recent memory.

Many organizations are still trying to recover from extended closures and maintain safe working environments—open enrollment is the last thing on their minds. Yet, procrastinating on enrollment planning can actually cause more issues than it solves. This article explains what employers can expect this enrollment period and how to prepare.