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Even as stay-at-home orders and restrictions are lifted, daily operations won’t be business-as-usual for many across the country. The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is still going on, despite businesses reopening. Moreover, public health officials and experts are warning of a potential second wave of COVID-19 cases.

Of course, no one knows if or when a second wave of infection will strike—or whether it will be as bad as or worse than the first wave. As such, businesses across the country should start planning today so they’re properly prepared for a second wave of COVID-19 cases.

These tools from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers guidance to assist employers in making (re)opening decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic. [caption id="attachment_61369" align="alignleft" width="150"] Workplaces During the COVID-19 Pandemic[/caption] [caption id="attachment_61368" align="alignleft" width="150"] Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic[/caption] [caption id="attachment_61367" align="alignleft" width="150"] Restaurants and...

While work restrictions may be lifting, the hazards related to the COVID-19 virus remain a significant health risk.   As businesses start to resume operations, we encourage you to consider these best practices to protect employees and visitors to your workplace.       Download the "Employer Return to Work Guide...

On April 1, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) published its 2020 North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria (OOSC). The new criteria supersede all previous iterations. The OOSC is intended to identify critical safety violations and provide guidelines for officers to use when conducting a roadside safety inspection...

Safety Matters HeaderCoronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. It has spread from China to many other countries around the world, including the United States. Depending on the severity of COVID-19’s international impacts, outbreak conditions—including those rising to the level of a pandemic—can affect all aspects of daily life, including travel, trade, tourism, food supplies, and financial markets.

To reduce the impact of COVID-19 outbreak conditions on businesses, workers, customers, and the public, it is important for all employers to plan now for COVID-19. For employers who have already planned for influenza pandemics, planning for COVID-19 may involve updating plans to address the specific exposure risks, sources of exposure, routes of transmission, and other unique characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 (i.e., compared to pandemic influenza viruses). Employers who have not prepared for pandemic events should prepare themselves and their workers as far in advance as possible of potentially worsening outbreak conditions. Lack of continuity planning can result in a cascade of failures as employers attempt to address challenges of COVID-19 with insufficient resources and workers who might not be adequately trained for jobs they may have to perform under pandemic conditions.